How to grow six of the most popular herbs at home



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basil

Comes in annual and perennial types.

aspect

Requires full sun, with some afternoon shade in really hot areas.

climate

Grows in spring or fall; suits a variety of climates. Dies off in winter.

floor

Plant in rich, moist, well-drained soil that has plenty of compost or old manure. Very sensitive to frost and does not like cold, damp weather.

water

Keep evenly moist.

fertilizer

Fertilize with a high-nitrogen fertilizer (follow package directions).

maintenance

Push out the tips to stay bushy. Pick young leaves whenever you need them.


chives

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chives

For a pretty and practical arrangement, plant herbs in mixed flower and vegetable beds – like chives, violets and kale. You can also eat the flowers in salads. A good companion of parsley.

aspect

Like full sun; A little shade and humidity may be needed in very hot, dry areas.

climate

Suitable for a variety of climates. Avoid planting in the extremes of summer and winter. The perennial dies back in winter.

floor

Grow in average, well-drained soil or in pots; keep the soil moist.

water

Once plants have been planted, water them regularly.

fertilizer

seasonal fertilizer.

maintenance

Cut the leaves at ground level at all times. Cut spears to harvest them. Remove blooms to encourage leaf growth.


coriander plant


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coriander

Coriander goes perfectly with seafood and is often used in Asian cuisine. The roots pack all the flavor and can be used in dressings, stir-fries, and more.

aspect

Grow in a sunny spot; A little shade is fine in very hot areas.

climate

An annual plant that likes hot, dry summers and wet winters. Hates Frost.

floor

Sowing in spring. Needs well drained soil, not too rich; too much nitrogen reduces the taste.

water

Water regularly.

fertilizer

Add a controlled release fertilizer or organic fertilizer when planting. After fertilizing, delay harvesting for a few days and, to be on the safe side, rinse well before cooking and eating.

maintenance

Grows well in pots. Pick fresh leaves as needed.


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mint

There are many types of mint; all are invasive.

aspect

Partial shade, as this perennial prefers shade. One thing to note is that Vietnamese mint is shade tolerant.

climate

Grows in a variety of climates.

floor

Plant in moderately rich, well-mulched, well-drained soil in spring or fall (anytime in frost-free gardens).

water

Water well in full sun – mint loves water.

fertilizer

A plant fertilizer is sufficient.

maintenance

If you don’t want heaps of the stuff, confine it to one pot while it’s growing wild (so plant it away from other plants). Pick young leaves a few sprigs at a time and freeze excess leaves to preserve the gorgeous color.


Parsely

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Parsely

Divine in chimichurri, savory soufflés, tabboulis and beef or lamb casseroles.

aspect

shade tolerant.

climate

Grows in a variety of climates. Lived for two years. Plant anytime in frost-free areas. In the tropics or hot, dry areas, avoid planting in summer.

floor

Plant in normal, well-drained garden soil.

water

Keep evenly moist.

fertilizer

Feed complete fertilizer sparingly (according to package instructions).

maintenance

Pick branches from the outside of the bush as needed.


sage

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sage

Sage adds a delightful aroma to your garden and is great for meat dishes, fried potatoes, butter and fillings. The perennial is a good companion to rosemary.

aspect

Find a sunny spot but sheltered from the wind.

climate

Grows well in cold-temperate, warm-temperate, and arid/semi-arid climates. Grow in pots in tropical and subtropical areas to protect them from flooding soil when wet.

floor

Prefers a light, well-drained soil.

water

Although drought tolerant, sage will do better with regular watering during the hotter months.

maintenance

Sow in the garden and stake as needed.

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