Rehab center shows 40 per cent surge in treatment requests as doctors warn isolated executives

‘Working from home fuels alcohol and drug addiction’: Rehab center reveals 40 per cent rise in treatment requests as doctors warn socially isolated executives secretly snorting cocaine in the attic and drinking alcohol in the garden shed

  • dr Niall Campbell linked working from home to an increase in drug addiction
  • The Priory Hospital in south-west London has seen 40 per cent more people
  • 58 percent increase in cocaine addiction and 88 percent increase in ketamine addiction
  • The UK drug market is worth nearly £10 billion a year and has had three million users

Working from home fuels alcohol and drug addictions, according to one expert, who says stressed executives are sipping booze in the attic and snorting cocaine in the garden.

Cocaine use is at “epidemic” levels and abuse of ketamine – a drug favorite among festival-goers – is also said to be rising fast.

South West London’s Priory Hospital, best known for treating celebrities for addiction, said it had asked 40 per cent more people for private treatment in the last year. It has seen a 58 percent increase in inquiries about cocaine addiction and an 88 percent increase in inquiries about ketamine.

An official survey of drug abuse published last year says the UK illicit drug market is worth nearly £10 billion a year and has three million users. Experts believe the true numbers are higher. It also said most addicts died in their 40s, and data is expected to show more people under the age of 50 were killed by drug abuse than by Covid-19 in 2020.

dr Nial Campbell said, “People with addictions are finding more opportunities without having to go to the office or attend meetings in person.”

dr Niall Campbell, consulting psychiatrist at the Priory, has linked working from home to an increase in drug addiction. Overwork, a lack of social contacts, money worries and strained relationships are to blame.

“Without the need to go to the office or attend meetings in person, people who are prone to addiction are finding more ways to continue it,” he said. “And for younger adults who are cut off from an office and maybe still live with their parents, there’s tremendous emotional distress, and we’re seeing more depression and anxiety in the 20+ age group, leading to unhealthy and addictive behaviors in many cases.”

He added: “People use all sorts of excuses to drink or do drugs at home, so they go on the roof of the house, in the attic or in the garden, shed or garden office and secretly drink from a hiding place ‘that they kept in the trunk.’

“Cocaine is extremely addictive and toxic, and the effects are highly unpredictable, particularly on the heart,” he added.

Pamela Roberts, a psychotherapist in Woking, Surrey, said: “I recently saw a city worker say that at work there was a ‘bracket’ on how much cocaine he could use because he was more visible. With lockdown and working from home, he was able to drink cocaine, get up later, attend a virtual meeting up close, sit “in the back” on a Zoom call, while he would if he showed up for work would be late came looking disheveled and people would have noticed.’

“People use all sorts of excuses to drink or do drugs at home, so they go to the roof of the house, the attic or the garden, shed or garden office and secretly drink from a stash they have in in the trunk,” he said

“People use all sorts of excuses to drink or do drugs at home, so they go to the roof of the house, the attic or the garden, shed or garden office and secretly drink from a stash they have in in the trunk,” he said

Last month, Boris Johnson exclaimed “middle-class cokeheads” whose habit, he said, “feeds a war on our streets that drives misery and crime in our country and beyond.”

Meanwhile, an analysis of the characteristics of cocaine users who entered specialized treatment over a 10-year period found that 81 percent were men and 19 percent were women, the European Monitoring Center for Drugs and Drug Addiction found. It also said the median age at first application was 22, while the median age of those treated for the first time was 31.

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